Birch Bark

Birch Bark

Birch Bark

Birch Bark

Our birch bark is usually available in stock flattened birch bark sheets that are about 2 to 3 mm. in thickness and approximately 24 inches X 36 inches. Will cut to other dimensions.

Used as wall covering (both inside and out) and crafts. It is removed from logs after harvest for lumber. I suggest that you order 10 to 20% more than the exact dimensions as the pieces are not exact and there will be some waste. Harvest normally starts in mid-May.

You will find that dried bark can be made more flexible and pliable by heating in warm water or by steaming it. Several layers of white paper may be peeled away on thick bark to make the remaining sheets easier to cut and fold. The bark can be attached to surfaces with white headed brads and/or wood glue.

Harvest commences in mid-May, depending on weather.

Here is a partial list of the items which can be produced with birch bark:

  • Baskets
  • Rustic furniture
  • Wall and ceiling panels
  • Canoes
  • Miniature canoes
  • Pencil holders
  • Lamp shades
  • Place mats,
  • Sign frames
  • Picture and mirror frames
  • Mail box covers
  • Light switch panel covers
  • Waste baskets
  • Tiissue box holders
  • Storage boxes
  • Flower pot covers
  • Leaf wreaths.

Birch Bark Canoe

Birch Bark Canoe

Birch Bark Crafting

When your rustic decor includes birch bark picture frames you are able to bring nature indoors. Birch covered frames can be made from fallen trees. An inexpensive frame can be purchased and frequently old fallen logs can be stripped to provide plenty of bark. Remove any accompanying debris and insects. The bark should be dry as it will curl while drying. Hot glue and or white headed brads are both useful to attach the bark to the frame. Adding natural elements like twigs, acorns or cones makes for a nice effect.

When putting birch bark on a ceiling or wall it (the bark) should be attached to plywood and then the plywood is attached to the wall.

Circular birch containers can be made by sewing bark pieces together. Loose material can be removed from the bark and the bark can be rolled with he ‘outside’ inside if you like. Use a sharpened nail or awl to make holes for stitching material (cordage or rawhide). The end or lid should be made from seasoned wood to avoid subsequent shrinking.

Thorns can be used in lieu of nails to attach the bottom. A handle can be attached to the lid.

Bark sheets 24″ x 36″ cost $6.75 / sq. ft. Shipping and handling is included. (Shown is six sq.ft.  for $40.50.)

Those interested in large quantities may qualify for discounts.

To learn more about using birch bark visit: www.nativetech.org/brchbark/brchbark.htm

Yogi Berra said: ‘If you don’t know where you are going, you might not get there.’

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